Derwent Valley Light Railway
Summer (August) Bank Holiday 2018
Derwent Valley Light Railway Society  is a Charitable Incorporated Organisation. Registered number 1161623
Derwent Valley Light Railway ℅ Murton Park, Murton Lane, Murton, York, YO19 5UF
Click for Derwent Valley Light Railway on day out with the kids
Besides all the indoor exhibits in the museum and galleries etc., there was, as ever a lot to see outdoors too. For example, the old threshing machine at right and the vintage tractor line-up below.  And days of Living History Shows. Showtime by “The Trailblazers”. The fantasy of Hollywood’s Wild West cowboys compared with reality. Besides being able to ride the train and to visit all the attractions at Murton Park, visitors were treated to extra highlights including the visit of the cowboys. At different times through the afternoon, three different exciting shows were acted out by The Trailblazers. There were loud bangs and gunpowder smoke from the enactments which included the Hollywood style shoot out, something which it turns out was untypical of the Wild West. In another show, shootings by famous characters from the Wild West days were re-enacted as they really  would have happened. The Trailblazers gave everyone a much more accurate view of the Wild West than the Hollywood movies would, with some Hollywood fantasy and comparisons made by re-enacting in a “living history” some of the events maligned by Hollywood. Visitors to the weekend events here at Murton Park were able to have a broad “grandstand” style view of the events from the safety of the fort.                     Above: Extracts fom the Hollywood style gunfight. Buildings within the fort include amongs many others a saloon and a gun smith’s shop. The gunsmith gave interesting talks about guns of the Wild West and their uses and had a lot of different guns to show, explaining the differences between them. He was a mine of information in answering the many questions visitors were asking. There were “Vikings” temporarily in residence in the Viking Village.    There are a number of temporary residents who return regularly to maintain the Viking Village and tend the plants.  The residents were keen show how the Vikings had lived and tell visitors about life in Viking times at York. Visitors learned there was little variety in the food crops available. Many of the varieties of food stuffs of today owe their existence in our diet to selective breeding of crops, importation from different climates and discoveries imported from across the World, particularly the New World. Although it appears that the Vikings discovered America long before Columbus, they did not bring back to Europe, potatoes, tomatoes, or tobacco etc.  Examples some of things grown in the village are brassicas, fennel to eat and for flavouring drinks, carrots which were white or purple and nothing like as tasty as the modern sweet orange varieties, and woad to use in the making of dye. A blacksmith was working at Murton Park’s Forge demonstrating his craft and showing the  making of various items. And now for something completely different: Looking like a machine from a Sci-Fi movie is this Buckeye Trencher which is on permanent display at Murton Park. You can read about it on a plate by the exhibit here at Murton Park.
Murton Park
Summer (August) Bank holiday 2018
Derwent Valley Light Railway ℅ Murton Park, Murton Lane, Murton, York, YO19 5UF
Murton Park Murton Park
Derwent Valley Light Railway Society  is a Charitable Incorporated Organisation. Registered number 1161623
Click: Derwent Valley Light Railway on day out with the kids Click: Derwent Valley Light Railway on day out with the kids Murton Park Murton Park
Cowboys and Vikings Cowboys and vikings  featured separately among the outdoor shows and living history here at Murton Park, over the Bank Holiday weekend. See about them lower down this page. Besides these, as ever there were the indoor exhibits in the museum and galleries etc. as well as the exhibits outdoors too. For example, the historic threshing machine  and the vintage tractor line-up below. And three days of Living History Shows. Showtime by “The Trailblazers”. The fantasy of Hollywood’s Wild West cowboys compared with reality. Besides being able to ride the train and to visit all the attractions at Murton Park, visitors were treated to extra highlights including the visit of the cowboys. At different times through the afternoon, three different exciting shows were acted out by The Trailblazers. There were loud bangs and gunpowder smoke from the enactments which included the Hollywood style shoot out, something which it turns out was untypical of the Wild West. In another show, shootings by famous characters from the Wild West days were re-enacted as they really would have happened. The Trailblazers gave everyone a much more accurate view of the Wild West than the Hollywood movies would, with some Hollywood fantasy and comparisons made by re-enacting in a “living history” some of the events maligned by Hollywood. Visitors to the weekend events here at Murton Park were able to have a broad “grandstand” style view of the events from the safety of the fort.                    Above: Extracts fom the Hollywood style gunfight. Buildings within the fort include amongs many others a saloon and a gun smith’s shop. The gunsmith gave interesting talks about guns of the Wild West and their uses and had a lot of different guns to show, explaining the differences between them. He was a mine of information in answering the many questions visitors were asking. There were “Vikings” temporarily in residence in the Viking Village.    There are a number of temporary residents who return regularly to maintain the Viking Village and tend the plants.  The residents were keen show how the Vikings had lived and tell visitors about life in Viking times at York. Visitors learned there was little variety in the food crops available. Many of the varieties of food stuffs of today owe their existence in our diet to selective breeding of crops, importation from different climates and discoveries imported from across the World, particularly the New World. Although it appears that the Vikings discovered America long before Columbus, they did not bring back to Europe, potatoes, tomatoes, or tobacco etc.  Examples some of things grown in the village are brassicas, fennel to eat and for flavouring drinks, carrots which were white or purple and nothing like as tasty as the modern sweet orange varieties, and woad to use in the making of dye. A blacksmith was working at Murton Park’s Forge demonstrating his craft and showing the  making of various items. And now for something completely different: Looking like a machine from a Sci-Fi movie is this Buckeye Trencher which is on permanent display at Murton Park. You can read about it on a plate by the exhibit here at Murton Park.